When to see a doctor

When unsure about the need to see a doctor or other professional, people can sometimes call their primary care doctor for guidance. Some doctors can be contacted by e-mail for nonemergency questions. Others prefer to be contacted by telephone. Doctors cannot give set guidelines for when to see a doctor and when it is unnecessary because symptoms with the same cause vary too much and symptoms with different causes overlap too much. However, some problems clearly require a call to a health care professional.

Local Services When to see a doctor

When unsure about the need to see a doctor or other professional, people can sometimes call their primary care doctor for guidance. Some doctors can be contacted by e-mail for nonemergency questions. Others prefer to be contacted by telephone. Doctors cannot give set guidelines for when to see a doctor and when it is unnecessary because symptoms with the same cause vary too much and symptoms with different causes overlap too much. However, some problems clearly require a call to a health care professional.


Reasons to call a Doctor

Problem

Reasons to Call


Cold or Influenza

Vomiting or inability to keep fluids down

Painful swallowing

Coughing that lasts more than 2 or 3 weeks

Earache

Symptoms that last more than 7 days


Diarrhea

Black or bloody stools

More than 6 to 8 watery stools in children

Symptoms of dehydration (such as very dry mouth and armpits, confusion, and decreased urination), particularly in children and older people


Digestive problems

A feeling that food is stuck in the throat

Development of or change in heartburn, particularly during exercise

Frequent heartburn, belching, or regurgitation

Persistent or severe abdominal pain

Persistent nausea


General problems

Symptoms that prevent participation in usual activities, particularly new or worsened shortness of breath with exertion

Unexplained weight loss

Dizziness or an about-to-faint feeling

Persistent fatigue

Sweating, especially heavy or cold sweats


Headaches

Severe headache that peaks in intensity within seconds

Memory loss or confusion

Blurred or double vision

Slurred speechn

Loss of balance or dizziness

Seizures

Numbness or weakness in the arms, legs, or face

Nausea


Heart problems

Rapid or galloping heartbeats (palpitations)

Chest pain


Leg problems

Pain in the calves that worsens when walking

Swelling in the ankles or legs


Menstrual problems

No periods by age 16

Sudden stopping of periods

A period that lasts much longer than usual or is excessively heavy

A sudden feeling of illness while using tampons

Severe or disabling cramps


Rash

Fever of 100.4° F (38° C) or above

A rash that is painful, involves swelling, or oozes


Sinusitis

Swelling or redness in or around an eye

Problems with vision


Vomiting

Moderate or severe abdominal pain

Symptoms of dehydration, particularly in children and older people

Green, black, or bloody vomit

*The list of problems and the reasons to call a doctor are only a small sample.


Flu Days

No appointment necessary

Dates Times
Tuesday 3rd October 9: 00 - 19: 00
Friday 6th October 9: 00 - 15: 00
Thursday 12th October 9: 00 - 17: 00
Monday 16th October 13: 00 - 19: 00
Tuesday 24th October 9: 00 - 13: 00
Wednesday 1st November 9: 00 - 15: 00

Opening Times

Our Location


Lingwell Croft Surgery
16 Shelldrake Drive
Middleton
Leeds
LS10 3NB


Lingwell Croft Surgery
16 Shelldrake Drive
Middleton
Leeds
LS10 3NB


16 Shelldrake Drive, Middleton , Leeds, LS10 3NB
Telephone: 0113 270 4848 or 0113 270 5372
Fax: 0113 272 0030
Text: 07940 353 995 (this number takes incoming texts only